Update: Late university sports icon to be honoured at Tim Hortons Field

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Published August 2, 2023 at 9:00 am

The 'Farewell to Ivor Wynne' concert featuring The Tragically Hip and Sam Roberts Band takes place on Oct. 6, 2012. Tim Hortons Field replaced the stadium in 2014. COURTESY HAMILTON TIGER-CATS VIA FACEBOOK
The 'Farewell to Ivor Wynne' concert featuring The Tragically Hip and Sam Roberts Band takes place on Oct. 6, 2012. Tim Hortons Field replaced the stadium in 2014. COURTESY HAMILTON TIGER-CATS VIA FACEBOOK

Update: The event celebrating the legacy of Ivor Wynne has been cancelled. The City of Hamilton said a new date will be announced.


Hamilton will celebrate the legacy of a prominent university sports figure with a commemorative sign and plaque at Tim Hortons Field on Friday.

In addition, the south end of the press box area will be named the Ivor Wynne Media Centre.

Hamilton Mayor Andrea Horwath will take part in the unveiling ceremony of the commemorative sign and plaque on Friday, Aug. 4, at 1:30 p.m.

“The unveiling ceremony will pay tribute to the longstanding sporting heritage of Hamilton,” the City wrote in a press release. “Ivor Wynne, renowned for his pivotal role in fostering a sense of community and passion for university sports, is set to receive a dedicated commemorative sign and plaque that encapsulates the stadium’s historical significance.”

According to an alumni bio on McMaster’s website, Wynne left Wales, where he was born  on Nov. 2, 1918, to immigrate to Canada with his family when he was six in 1924. His family eventually settled in downtown Hamilton in 1928. He became McMaster’s athletic director in 1948 after he graduated from the university in 1940 and spent time in the Canadian military during the Second World War. Among his accomplishments, Wynne expanded the school’s physical education course, led the creation of its athletic centre, coached basketball and was instrumental in establishing the School of Physical Education.

In 1967, Wynne was named chairman of the parks board. The city sought his advice during Civic Stadium’s major renovations in 1970 that would help the iconic building reach modern–day standards. He died suddenly of a rare blood disease at age 52 before the renovations were completed. Shortly after his death in November 1970, the city parks board voted to rename the stadium in his honour. 

The Ivor Wynne Stadium was originally called the Civic Stadium when it opened in 1930. It was the former home of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats before it was demolished and replaced with the Tim Hortons Field in 2014.

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